Antibiotic Stewardship Progress Report

Section I: The Challenge

The Challenge of Nourishing Our World

To live well, people must eat well. But, there are barriers to this reality.

Feeding a global population expected to grow to 9.7 billion by 2050 comes with complex challenges. The salient issues lay at the intersection of population growth, increased demand for meat, milk and eggs, animal health, sustainability, and a balanced dialogue surrounding these topics. Let’s take a look at the current landscape:

Providing for a Growing Population

More than one in three individuals worldwide receives inadequate nutrition, ranging from hunger and malnutrition to overweight and obesity. This leads to a debilitating spectrum of health concerns from physical and cognitive development limitations to diabetes. As our population grows, so too, does the demand for affordable proteins, including meat, milk, and eggs. The United Nation’s Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) estimates the protein demand will climb by 60 percent as the global middle class dramatically expands during the next few decades. Already, demand for the most affordable proteins - eggs, milk and poultry - is seven percent higher than expectations. Feeding a growing population will require new ways to effectively and efficiently produce more protein.

Managing Animal Disease Threats

Meanwhile, the health of animals - the source of this much-needed protein - is challenged. Today, approximately 20 percent of livestock around the world are lost to disease, representing a significant source of food waste and lost resources. One in four dairy cattle face mastitis, an infection of the udder that accounts for the greatest uses of shared-class antibiotics in the dairy industry. Similarly, nine in 10 chickens are threatened by coccidiosis, an intestinal parasite that causes diarrhea, dehydration, anemia and even death. These disease challenges compromise animal welfare and quality of life, as well as our ability to provide wholesome, available food for a growing population.

Protecting the Planet

Sustaining all aspects of our global population annually uses the natural resources equivalent of 1.6 Earths. Overuse is simply not a long-term option. Feeding our growing population is one area we can improve our footprint. With new approaches, we can sustainably meet the need for safe, sufficient, affordable protein that is necessary for optimal health. Healthier people, healthier animals and a healthier environment are essential for a secure, prosperous planet.

Transparency and Informed Decision Making

Consumers increasingly have questions about how their food is grown, and we have a responsibility to increase the availability of accurate information about food and food choices to help consumers make informed decisions. Marketing and labels that drive brand differentiation also create confusion about what’s safe and healthy. We all deserve a better food system and healthier options. Well-meaning, but misinformed positions, have the potential to affect how we all eat. We must make decisions, enact policies and take actions based on science, not misinformation and confusion. We must make decisions that optimize the health of people, animals and the planet, not maximize one at the expense of others.

Addressing these challenges is bigger than any one entity. It will require participants across the food chain and healthcare systems, including farmers, veterinarians, doctors, global leaders, non-governmental organizations, the public and private sectors - to work together. This is the only way we can solve a challenge of this size and urgency. It’s our responsibility for people today and for the generations to come.

Section II: One Health

We Believe in the Power of One Health For People, Animals and the Planet

The link between healthy people, healthy animals and a healthy environment is inextricable.

Our world is connected. Health is no exception. One Health is the universal truth that healthy people, healthy animals and a healthy planet interconnect. The approaches to solving challenges must consider the impact - and the power of all three - working in concert.

The One Health concept has been recognized in the scientific and medical communities for some time. By expanding and enhancing the principles of One Health, there is an opportunity to make relevant connections - between people, animals and the planet - to address challenges. Healthy animals have better quality lives, limit potential for disease spread, support livelihoods and provide nutrient-rich meat, milk and eggs to nourish and support human health. Healthy animals also are productive, efficient animals that limit resource use, protecting our planet.

The foundation of human health is quality nutrition from a balanced diet, including meat, milk and eggs. Globally, one in three people get the wrong nutrition from malnutrition to obesity. The side effects last a lifetime. Experts say a full quarter of the world’s children - one in four - suffers from chronic malnutrition - which results in stunted growth, weaker immune systems, lower IQs and lower productivity over their lives. On the opposite spectrum, overweight and obesity drive diabetes, cardiovascular disease and other challenges. A healthy, balanced diet supports proper growth and cognitive development, limits non-communicable diseases and helps people achieve their potential.

Adopting a One Health approach means looking at healthy people, healthy animals and a healthy planet collectively because they all intersect in important ways, affecting everything from the food you put on the table to the way doctors treat infections. It’s about optimizing the health of all three.

We must produce larger quantities of high-quality and affordable meat, milk and eggs, while doing it in ways that are socially responsible, environmentally sound, and economically viable. We must create One Health to truly thrive today and tomorrow.

Section III: Antibiotic Resistance

We Support Responsible Antibiotic Use

Antimicrobial resistance is a significant health challenge, and animal agriculture can play a role in the solution.

Antibiotics are a critically important tool farmers and veterinarians use to ensure the heath and welfare of animals, as well as the safety of our food supply. But they’re just one tool. Farmers and veterinarians work closely together to design and implement comprehensive animal welfare programs that take into account quality diets, clean and comfortable housing, disease prevention and treatment as well as other factors. When antibiotics are used, they must be used responsibly and under strict veterinary guidance.

There are three common types of antibiotics.

Responsible antibiotic use means providing the right dose at the right time to the right animals to help them stay healthy. In livestock, antibiotics are used to:

In the United States, Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Guidance #209 and #213 identify medically-important, shared-class antibiotic classes and limit their use only as necessary to assure animal health, removing growth promotion uses. These guidelines also increase the role of the veterinarian, removing over-the-counter uses and requiring veterinarian oversight. Following regulatory changes occurring in the United States and Canada, North American regulations will align closely with Europe.

We recognize that antibiotic resistance is a real concern and we all have a responsibility to work collaboratively toward solutions. But, we cannot isolate animal agriculture as the only, or primary, cause of this important issue.

The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) tracks 18 major antibiotic resistance threats. Only two, campylobacter and non-typhoidal Salmonella, are associated with animals. The most serious pathogens are not related to antibiotics used in food animals.

URGENT THREATS
  • Clostridium difficile
  • Carbapenem-resistant enterobacterlaceae (CRE)
  • Drug-resistant neisseria gonorrhoeae
SERIOUS THREATS
  • Multidrug-resistant acinetobacter
  • Drug-resistant campylobacter
  • Fluconazole-resistant candida (a fungus)
  • Extended spectrum β-lactamase producing enterobacteriaceae (ESBLs)
  • Vancomycin-resistant enterococcus (VRE)
  • Multidrug-resistant pseudomonas aeruginosa
  • Drug-resistant non-typholdal salmonella
  • Drug-resistant salmonella typhl
  • Drug-resistant shigella
CONCERNING THREATS
  • Vancomycin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (VRSA)
  • Erythromycin-resistant group A streptococcus
  • Clindamycin-resistant group B streptococcus

The United Kingdom (UK) Department of Health states: "Increasing scientific evidence suggests that the clinical issues with antimicrobial resistance that we face in human medicine are primarily the result of antibiotic use in people, rather than the use of antibiotics in animals." Further, data published by the CDC states that 30 percent of antibiotics prescribed for people by public health officials are unnecessary.

There must be a collaborative effort among farmers, veterinarians, doctors and other public health officials to find solutions that reduce the need for shared-class antibiotics and ensure their long-term effectiveness. While antibiotic resistance to the primary treatments associated with animal agriculture remains low, the industry is committed to continued evaluation and improvement.

Farmers and veterinarians work closely together and with other animal health experts to design comprehensive animal well-being programs that take into account housing, diet, the treatment and prevention of disease, and other animal health factors. But bacteria are everywhere. When animals get sick, antibiotics are needed. Responsible antibiotic use means providing the right dose at the right time to the right animal to maintain health.

Some diseases can only be effectively addressed with antibiotics. As such, it’s critically important that we don’t enact regulations or policies that move faster than available science - which could jeopardize animal health and food safety. Policies that require the complete elimination of all antibiotics in animal production are not right for animals, people or the planet.

Section IV: Progress Report

Elanco’s 8-Point Antibiotic Stewardship Plan

A Summary of Progress

Addressing antibiotic resistance is truly a global challenge. It is bigger than any one company, organization or initiative. We have to work together toward a common goal of reducing resistance, while doing our part as individual entities to make real and sustainable progress.

This is why in 2015 Elanco introduced an 8-Point Antibiotic Stewardship Plan that includes promoting responsible antibiotic use; decreasing the need for shared-class antibiotics; and bringing alternatives to livestock producers to help treat and prevent animal disease. We’re moving swiftly ahead to fulfill that plan, while respecting that there are no quick and easy solutions.

  1. Act with responsibility globally - not just according to U.S. regulation - by working with food producers and retailers to provide training and encourage policies that reduce shared-class antibiotic use and increase veterinarian oversight.

    This data and the counsel of the Elanco team has helped shape antibiotic policy to establish or enhance responsible use of antibiotics for dozens of protein value chain partners across the globe, as well as helping to ensure the products and tools regulators prefer are used in the food system. Elanco will continue to provide research around this topic and share findings openly with all constituents involved in the food chain process.

    Elanco has worked with more than 10,000 producers, veterinarians and food chain partners globally to help improve responsible use of antibiotics, including:

    • Creating awareness of pending regulatory changes
    • Providing counsel on policy creation and resulting practice changes
    • Offering analysis of supply chain implications from potential policy changes
    • Sharing research into consumer perceptions and how to address consumer questions about antibiotics
    • Delivering health monitoring and tracking data to producers to help them to them make more informed animal health and care decisions to potentially reduce the need for antibiotic treatment

    Data and the counsel of the Elanco team has helped shape antibiotic policy to establish or enhance responsible use of antibiotics for dozens of protein value chain partners across the globe, as well as helping to ensure the products and tools regulators prefer are used in the food system. Elanco will continue working closely with farmers and veterinarians to support responsible use.

    New Commitment: Creating value by aggregating information, interventions and innovation

    In an effort to reduce the need for antibiotics to treat animal illness, the industry is increasingly focused on disease prevention and early disease detection. Elanco is helping prevention and detection efforts globally by linking diagnostics and production outcomes with integrated analytics to predict disease risk and design sustainable solutions. With expanded access to data, a growing product portfolio, and precision application, antibiotic alternatives such as vaccines, enzymes, and probiotics will become more reliable and more effective. Our vision is not just to move from treatment to prevention, but to develop technologies that promote health even before an animal is born—this can reduce the need for antibiotic use while maintaining animal welfare and improving food security.

  2. Cease marketing of growth promotion uses for shared-class antibiotics and complete full regulatory change to end growth promotion use of shared-class antibiotics globally by the end of 2016.

    Elanco stopped all marketing of growth promotion uses of shared-class antibiotics around the world by August of 2016. The company has also completed 97 label-change submissions to remove growth promotion claims around the world for four shared-class molecules.

  3. Help customers eliminate continuous use of shared-class antibiotics for therapy purposes by providing an alternative.

    In certain disease challenges, shared-class antibiotics are used for specific diseases for extended periods of time under veterinary supervision. Yet, even in these scenarios we are working to find alternatives that lessen this need.

    The prevention of liver abscess in beef cattle is a particular area of focus for Elanco to help customers eliminate continuous use of shared-class antibiotics. Liver abscesses are observed in cattle around the world, regardless of production system. They affect the animal’s health, performance and value, but experts don’t fully understand the disease. Further, the science in this area hasn’t been materially advanced in more than 30 years. Elanco is pioneering new research to better understand the disease, alternative dosing programs, vaccine combinations and other non-shared-class antibiotic alternatives. Specifically we are:

    • Researching new models to better understand the disease: how abscesses form, the impact of rumen function, the incidence rate of liver abscesses and determining if there are new pathways or pathogens to target
    • Conducting trials to understand contributing factors that can lead to liver abscesses, such as: feed type, roughage levels, other feed additives and modifying days on feed to impact their abscess rates

    Under U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) Guidance 209 and 213, the current label for liver abscesses remains as a therapeutic use, but Elanco has submitted label changes to require veterinary oversight via a Veterinary Feed Directive (VFD).

    We’ve accelerated our efforts to identify alternatives, but this is an area where it’s incredibly important that policies don’t get ahead of the science, which could jeopardize animal welfare or food safety. We support the veterinarians and other animal health experts who decide the most appropriate treatment currently available to ensure the health and welfare of the animal. We won’t enact any approved therapeutic label changes until there are alternatives available to help our customers protect animal health and welfare.

    New Commitment: Elanco has announced a new partnership with Kansas State University to explore discovery and development of a liver abscess vaccine as an alternative to antibiotics.

  4. Eliminate over-the-counter sales of shared-class antibiotics, where oversight exists.

    Elanco is working to ensure that disease diagnosis and administration of antibiotics is managed with veterinarian oversight. Elanco has completed submission of 67 labels for five shared-class molecules to move products from over-the-counter use to be under the oversight of a veterinarian in the United States, Canada and Brazil, the countries where over-the-counter uses remained and veterinary infrastructure exists.

    Unfortunately, the infrastructure doesn't exist in all parts of the globe to allow for this move completely. In places where veterinarian oversight is not available, we are working to educate farmers and others on the responsible use and administration of antibiotics. Further, during the One Health Antibiotic Stewardship Summit in September 2016, Elanco collaborated with the industry, governments, and NGOs to begin work to develop this veterinary capability and identify other paths for health professional involvement in antibiotic use decisions.

  5. Eliminate concurrent use of shared-class antibiotics to treat the same disease.

    There is concern that concurrent use of antibiotics, using two shared-class antibiotics at the same time for the same condition, may heighten the potential for resistance development. There are some combination products that are approved for concurrent use by regulatory agencies because each addresses different disease conditions or the combination demonstrates better clinical outcomes and safety. The use of two or more shared-class antibiotics for the same disease condition that do not have a co-formulation approved is not recommended.

    Elanco does not support concurrent use of shared-class antibiotics to treat the same disease where there is no co-formulation approved.

    We support efforts to ensure the use of shared-class antibiotics focuses on the right drug, right dose, right duration and right time.

  6. Support veterinary oversight and responsible use, including helping build infrastructure globally.

    Significant portions of the world depend on livestock for their daily survival. Nearly one billion head of livestock are kept by more than 600 million small farmers and herders in rural areas around the world. Most of these livestock keepers - about 95 percent - live in extreme poverty. Proper animal health care is critical to protect the welfare of animals, mitigate the losses from illness and death in herds or flocks, reduce human exposure to zoonotic diseases and maintain the long-term effectiveness of antibiotics and other tools.

    We believe veterinarians and other animal health experts are the foundation for proper animal care and food safety.

    For example, when a national livestock project in Togo provided small farmers and herders in 300 rural communities with access to animal vaccines, the health and productivity of the livestock improved and incomes increased.

    Yet, there is extremely limited availability of these types of services in many developing countries. Some countries even lack training and governance for these types of services. This is a significant issue that will require the collaboration of many. Elanco convened industry leaders at a One Health Antibiotic Stewardship Summit in September 2016 to identify actions to build veterinary training and capacity where gaps exist globally. A committee formed from that meeting is working to:

    • Identify a self-sustainable model for providing veterinary services in a way that meets the needs of varying sizes and levels of operations plus assuring appropriate antibiotic use
    • Create recommendations that elevate global veterinary standards through curriculum and certification
    • Identify gaps in global animal health care including pharmacovigilance and discuss pathways to expand veterinary and para-veterinary capacity and responsibility to meet those needs
  7. Develop new animal-only antibiotics. No animal should ever be treated with a shared-class antibiotic if an animal-only option exists. Animal-only antibiotics optimize animal welfare without compromising human use antibiotics.

    Antibiotics classes used exclusively in animals pose virtually no risk of contributing to human bacterial resistance and can help reduce the need for shared-class antibiotics. Animals are susceptible to different diseases and have different health needs than humans.

    In 2016, Elanco gained U.S. approval for two new animal-only antibiotics in pork and poultry, giving producers new alternatives to protect animal health and well-being without potentially impacting antibiotic treatment outcomes for people. The products:

    • Prevent mortality caused by necrotic enteritis in poultry
    • Reduce the incidence and severity of diarrhea caused by pathogenic E.coli in weaned pigs

    Inteprity™ is a first-in-class antibiotic that is only used in animals. It’s also the first product approved for U.S. poultry requiring a veterinary feed directive (VFD), which means it can only be used under the prescription and oversight of a veterinarian for the prevention of mortality caused by necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens. Necrotic enteritis is a serious and constant threat to the health and welfare of poultry flocks. Today, the incidence of necrotic enteritis is on the rise, with daily mortality rates as high as one percent,. With almost nine billion birds produced annually in the United States, this represents a significant health concern. Preventing mortality caused by necrotic enteritis has a positive impact on bird health, well-being and the economic viability of poultry farmers, while supporting a responsible approach to antibiotic use.

    Kavault™, a first-in-class, animal-only antibiotic, has been approved in the United States to reduce the incidence and severity of diarrhea caused by pathogenic E. coli in weaned pigs. Kavault is from a new class of antibiotics that is not used in humans, eliminating the potential for a negative human treatment outcome due to antibiotic resistance. The product also must be administered under the oversight of a veterinarian through the new veterinary feed directive (VFD), process.

  8. Create alternatives. Elanco commits to invest two-thirds of our food animal research budget to quickly evaluate 25 candidates and deliver 10 viable non-antibiotic development projects that address diseases where there are few, or no, alternatives to shared-class antibiotics.

    In June of 2015, Elanco announced its 8-point Antibiotic Stewardship Plan. Since that time we have restructured our Food Animal research and development efforts, creating two new research and development teams and investing approximately 90 percent of our food animal research budget into advancing antibiotic alternatives. During this time, Elanco scientists have generated nearly 100 alternative ideas to shared-class antibiotic use for key disease targets. To date, 17 new candidates have demonstrated efficacy and have moved into the development pipeline, 12 additional projects will complete proof- of- concept efficacy studies in the next year.

    Also in 2016, Elanco launched or expanded geographic availability of four antibiotic alternatives including vaccines, enzymes and a protein. The first-of-its-kind protein helps support the natural function of a dairy cow's immune system, reducing the incidence of clinical mastitis in the first 30 days of after calving.

    In 2016 Elanco gained approval of Imrestor™ (pegbovigrastim injection) - the first product of its kind for the dairy industry to reduce the incidence of clinical mastitis in the first 30 days of after calving. Imrestor is a protein that helps support the natural function of a dairy cow’s immune system during the critical time around calving, when she is most vulnerable to mastitis.

    Mastitis is the most common disease among dairy cows, affecting as many as 1 in 4 cows, and is the greatest reason for shared-class antibiotic use in dairies. Mastitis affects the cow’s welfare and potential, leading to reduced conception rates, an increased risk for another case of mastitis, and lost milk production potential throughout the lactation.

New Commitments:

Our efforts will continue in the years ahead. By 2020, Elanco believes we can provide solutions that address five of the most critical unmet livestock disease challenges in a fundamentally new way.

We will increase the awareness of these unmet disease challenges and work to inspire and incentivize new innovation from many sources, including internal development, external partnerships and open source innovation. A few examples include:

Internal

Building Nutritional Health Capability: Using the most advanced science, Elanco's newly-formed Nutritional Health organization will develop, manufacture, and market products that fit and shape consumer preferences across all production systems. Our focus includes a range of products which will improve the health of animals through nutrition while providing value to our customers. These products could include prebiotics, probiotics, and enzymes, among additional technologies which improve the gut health of animals and reduce the use of conventional antibiotics. In addition to Elanco's current products in this space, the new business is anticipated to deliver two new products to customers annually between 2017 and 2020.

Vaccines Innovation Center: Elanco previously announced the opening of a new 48,000 square-foot state-of-the-art Vaccines Innovation Center with room for up to 100 scientists to tackle several important fields of research, including finding alternatives to antibiotics used in food animals. Two near-term projects involve exploring vaccines for salmonella - which is estimated to cause one million foodborne illnesses in the United States and roughly 82,000 in the EU annually - and bovine respiratory disease, which affects three in four cattle.

Work being conducted in the Vaccines Innovation Center is a tangible result of Elanco’s 8-Point Antibiotic Stewardship Plan and underscores our commitment to invest in innovation, bringing new antibiotic alternatives to market.

Partnerships

Elanco has established a partnership with EnBiotix to explore the application of EnBiotix’s engineered phage technology to identify and optimize drug candidates for specific animal health targets. If successful, this endeavor could result in potential alternatives for traditional antibiotics in animals.

Phage therapy is an alternative and/or complementary approach to traditional antibiotics for treating bacterial infections. Bacteriophages are naturally-occurring viruses that only infect bacteria and not humans. They self-replicate inside the bacteria, harnessing bacterial machinery for DNA and protein synthesis and ultimately killing the bacteria by lysis of the cell.

Open Source

Through InnoCentive, Elanco has announced the Alternatives to Animal Antibiotics Grand Challenge, committing more than $2 million to support the identification of promising new alternatives to five critical animal health disease challenges. These include liver abscesses in beef cattle; necrotic enteritis and coccidiosis in poultry; and lawsonia and strep suis in pigs. These are some of livestock farmers’ most critical challenges, and greatest uses of shared-class antibiotics today. Elanco will engage InnoCentive’s network of 375,000 problem solvers to seek new and unique ideas to combat these diseases.

Fighting an Increasing Threat

An increase in outbreaks of severe E. coli -associated diarrhea in newly weaned pigs (PWD) has been documented globally, manifesting as sudden death or severe diarrhea in infected pigs. Considering the average efficacy of antibiotics on these outbreaks is 80 percent, with documented antibiotic resistant strains, PWD has become a growing concern for producers. Additionally, the environmental impact of PWD is significant, as the pigs who do recover rarely "catch up" according to veterinarians, and PWD can increase feed use by 7-9 percent.

To address this growing threat in the EU, Elanco launched a new live vaccine, non-pathogenic culture of E.coli O8:K87 indicated for the active immunization against enterotoxigenic F4-positive E.coli in pigs. The newly launched vaccine's single oral dose can be administered in water, eliminating the trauma of injection, and protects pigs for up to 21 days reducing the need for antibiotics.

Important Safety Information

Inteprity

Indication - For the prevention of mortality caused by necrotic enteritis associated with Clostridium perfringens in broiler chickens.

CAUTION: Federal law restricts medicated feed containing this veterinary feed directive (VFD) drug to use by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian. To assure responsible antimicrobial drug use in broiler chickens, treatment administration must be on or before 10 days of age. The safety of avilamycin has not been established in chickens intended for breeding purposes. Avilamycin has not been demonstrated to be effective in broiler chickens showing clinical signs of necrotic enteritis prior to the start of medication. The Veterinary Feed Directive (VFD) expiration date must not exceed 90 days from the date of issuance. VFDs for avilamycin shall not be refilled.

Kavault

Indication - For the reduction in incidence and overall severity of diarrhea in the presence of pathogenic Escherichia coli in groups of weaned pigs.

CAUTION: Federal law restricts medicated feed containing this veterinary feed directive (VFD) drug to use by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian. To assure responsible antimicrobial drug use in pigs, do not administer to pigs 14 weeks of age or older. Do not administer medicated feed containing avilamycin to pigs for more than a lifetime total of 42 days. Avilamycin has not been demonstrated to be effective in pigs showing clinical signs of diarrhea prior to the start of medication. The safety of avilamycin has not been established in swine intended for breeding purposes. Veterinary Feed Directive (VFD) expiration date must not exceed 90 days from the date of issuance. VFDs for avilamycin shall not be refilled. No withdrawal period required when fed according to label. Avoid inhalation, oral exposure, and direct contact with skin or eyes.

Imrestor

Indication - For the reduction in the incidence of clinical mastitis in the first 30 days of lactation in periparturient dairy cows and periparturient replacement dairy heifers.

CAUTION: Available only by veterinary prescription. Not for use in humans. Keep out of reach of children. In case of accidental self-injection, wash the site of injection thoroughly with clean running water. Foreign proteins such as pegbovigrastim have the potential to cause anaphylactic-type reactions. No withdrawal period or milk discard time is required when used according to the labeling. Do not use Imrestor to treat cows with clinical mastitis because effectiveness has not been demonstrated for this use. Some cases of hypersensitivity-type reactions have been observed in studies outside the United States within five minutes to two hours, occurring most often after the first administration of Imrestor. These reactions resolve within hours of onset with or without therapeutic intervention and have not been shown to reoccur with subsequent injections of Imrestor.

Section V

New Commitments

Developing New Alternatives

By 2020, Elanco believes we can provide solutions that address five of the most critical, unmet livestock disease challenges in a fundamentally new way. Other new commitments include:

  • Opening of the Elanco Vaccines Innovation Center in June of 2016. This state-of-the-art laboratory with space for up to 100 personnel. Near-term projects include vaccines for Salmonella and Bovine Respiratory Disease
  • Partnership from EnBiotix to explore application of engineered phage technology for bacterial infections as an alternative to traditional antibiotics.
  • Partnership with Kansas State University to explore discovery and development of a liver abscess vaccine.
  • Creation of the Elanco Alternatives to Animal Antibiotics Grand Challenge awarding more than $2 million to support identification of new and novel ways to treat liver abscesses in cattle, necrotic enteritis and coccidiosis in poultry, and lawsonia and strep suis in pigs without antibiotics.
Building Nutritional Health Capability

Using the most advanced science, Elanco's newly-formed Nutritional Health organization will develop, manufacture, and market products that fit and shape consumer preferences across all production systems. Our focus includes a range of products which will improve the health of animals through nutrition while providing value to our customers. These products could include prebiotics, probiotics, and enzymes, among additional technologies which improve the gut health of animals and reduce the use of conventional antibiotics. In addition to Elanco's current products in this space, the new business is anticipated to deliver two new products to customers annually between 2017 and 2020.

Prevention 360: Creating value by aggregating information, interventions and innovation

In an effort to reduce the need for antibiotics to treat animal illness, the industry is increasingly focused on disease prevention and early disease detection. Elanco is helping prevention and detection efforts globally by linking diagnostics and production outcomes with integrated analytics to predict disease risk and design sustainable solutions. With expanded access to data, a growing product portfolio, and precision application, antibiotic alternatives such as vaccines, enzymes, and probiotics will become more reliable and more effective. Our vision is not just to move from treatment to prevention, but to develop technologies that promote health even before an animal is born—this can reduce the need for antibiotic use while maintaining animal welfare and improving food security.

Facilitate Greater Collaboration

Elanco facilitated the One Health Antibiotic Stewardship Summit in September 2016, convening more than 200 global animal protein industry leaders, including more than 50 CEOs and owners, intergovernmental organizations, NGOs, and experts to address critical challenges:

  • Increasing global veterinary training and capacity
  • Enhancing metrics and monitoring of responsible use globally
  • Increasing incentives for innovation and working to enhance predictability of regulatory pathways

Section VI

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http://www.oie.int/for-the-media/editorials/detail/article/feeding-the-world-better-by-controlling-animal-diseases/

Holland, J., et al. Assessing the farm-level cost of mastitis. J. Dairy Sci. 2015;98 (Suppl. 2):234. (Abstr 137) http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/s0167587715300490

Williams, R.B. "Intercurrent coccidiosis and necrotic enteritis of chickens: rational, integrated disease management by maintenance of gut integrity." Avian Pathology (2010) 171

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